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The Perils of Pauline

By: Charles Goddard

Excerpt: Chapter 1. THE BREATH OF DEAD CENTURIES. In one of the stateliest mansions on the lower Hudson, near New York, old Stanford Marvin, president of the Marvin Motors Company, dozed over his papers, while Owen, his confidential secretary, eyed him across the mahogany flat?topped desk. A soft purring sound floated in the open window and half?roused the aged manufacturer. It came from one of his own cars six cylinders chanting in unison a litany of power to the great ...

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The Five Books of Youth

By: Robert Hillyer

The leaves rain down upon the forest pond, An elfin tarn green-shadowed in the fern; Nine yews ensomber the wet bank, beyond The autumn branches of the beeches burn With yellow flame and red amid the green, And patches of the darkening sky between.

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The Paris Commune and the Idea of the State

By: Michael Bakunin

This work, like all my published work, of which there has not been a great deal, is an outgrowth of events. It is the natural continuation of my Letters to a Frenchman (September 1870), wherein I had the easy but painful distinction of foreseeing and foretelling the dire calamities which now beset France and the whole civilized world, the only cure for which is the Social Revolution. My purpose now is to prove the need for such a revolution. I shall review the historical...

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While the Billy Boils

By: Henry Lawson

Excerpt: First Series AN OLD MATE OF YOUR FATHER?S You remember when we hurried home from the old bush school how we were sometimes startled by a bearded apparition, who smiled kindly down on us, and whom our mother introduced, as we raked off our hats, as ?An old mate of your father?s on the diggings, Johnny.? And he would pat our heads and say we were fine boys, or girls?as the case may have been?and that we had our father?s nose but our mother?s eyes, or the other way...

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Endimion and Phoebe

By: Michael Drayton

Excerpt: To Idea. A Midst those shades wherein the Muses sit, Thus to Idea, my Idea sings, Support of wisedome, better force of Wit: Which by desert, desert to honour brings, Borne to create good thoughts by thy rare woorth, Whom Nature with her bounteous store doth blesse, More excellent then Art can set thee forth; Happy in more, then praises can expresse: Which by thy selfe shalt make thy selfe continue, When all worlds glory shall be cleane forgot, Thus I the least o...

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A Siren

By: Thomas Adolphus Trollope

Excerpt: It was Carnival time in the ancient and once imperial, but now provincial and remote, city of Ravenna. It was Carnival time, and the very acme and high?tide of that season of mirth and revel. For the theory of Carnival observance is, that the life of it, unlike that of most other things and beings, is intensified with a constantly crescendo movement up to the last minutes of its existence. And there now remained but an hour before midnight on the Tuesday precedi...

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The Li Ki

By: James Legge

PREFACE: I MAY be permitted to express my satisfaction that, with the two volumes of the Lî Kî now published, I have done, so far as translation is concerned, all and more than all which I undertook to do on the Chinese Classics more than twenty-five years ago. When the first volume was published in 1891, my friend, the late Stanislas Julien, wrote to me, asking if I had duly considered the voluminousness of the Lî Kî, and expressing his doubts whether I should be able t...

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An Answer to the Question : What Is Enlightenment?

By: Immanuel Kant

Konigsberg in Prussia, 30th September, 1784. Enlightenment is man's emergence from his self-incurred immaturity. Immaturity is the inability to use one's own understanding without the guidance of another. This immaturity is self-incurred if its cause is not lack of understanding, but lack of resolution and courage to use it without the guidance of another. The motto of enlightenment is therefore: Sapere aude! Have courage to use your own understanding!

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London in 1731

By: Don Manoel Gonzales

Introduction: Don Manoel Gonzales is the assumed name of the writer of a ?Voyage to Great Britain, containing an Account of England and Scotland,? which was first printed in the first of the two folio volumes of ?A Collection of Voyages and Travels, compiled from the Library of the Earl of Oxford? (Robert Harley, who died in 1724, but whose industry in collection was continued by his son Edward, the second Earl), ?interspersed and illustrated with Notes.? These volumes, ...

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A Man by the Name of Ziegler

By: Hermann Hesse

Excerpt: There was once a young man by the name of Ziegler, who lived on Brauergasse. He was one of those people we see every day on the street, whose faces we can never really remember, because they all have the same face: a collective face. Ziegler was everything and did everything that such people always are and do. He was not stupid, but neither was he gifted; he loved money and pleasure, liked to dress well, and was as cowardly as most people: his life and activitie...

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Madam How and Lady Why

By: Charles Kingsley

Preface: My dear boys, When I was your age, there were no such children?s books as there are now. Those which we had were few and dull, and the pictures in them ugly and mean: while you have your choice of books without number, clear, amusing, and pretty, as well as really instructive, on subjects which were only talked of fifty years ago by a few learned men, and very little understood even by them. So if mere reading of books would make wise men, you ought to grow up m...

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Behind the News : Voices from Goa's Press

By: Joshua Hutchinson
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The Secrets of the Princesse de Cadignan

By: Honore De Balzac

Excerpt: THE LAST WORD OF TWO GREAT COQUETTES. After the disasters of the revolution of July, which destroyed so many aristocratic fortunes dependent on the court, Madame la Princesse de Cadignan was clever enough to attribute to political events the total ruin she had caused by her own extravagance. The prince left France with the royal family, and never returned to it, leaving the princess in Paris, protected by the fact of his absence; for their debts, which the sale ...

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Adapa and the Food of Life

By: R.W. Rogers

Excerpt: [Summary: Adapa, or perhaps Adamu, son of Ea, had recieved from his father, the god Ea, wisdom, but not eternal life. He was a semi?divine being and was the wise man and priest of the temple of Ea at Eridu, which he provided with the ritual bread and water. In the exercise of this duty he carried on fishing upon the Persian Gulf. When Adapa was fishing one day on a smooth sea, the south wind rose suddenly and overturned his boat, so that the was thrown into the ...

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Pigs Is Pigs

By: Ellis Parker Butler

Excerpt: Mike Flannery, the Westcote agent of the Interurban Express Company, leaned over the counter of the express office and shook his fist. Mr. Morehouse, angry and red, stood on the other side of the counter, trembling with rage. The argument had been long and heated, and at last Mr. Morehouse had talked himself speechless. The cause of the trouble stood on the counter between the two men. It was a soap box across the top of which were nailed a number of strips, for...

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The Valley of the Giants

By: Peter B. Kyne

Excerpt: Chapter One. In the summer of 1850 a topsail schooner slipped into the cove under Trinidad Head and dropped anchor at the edge of the kelp?fields. Fifteen minutes later her small?boat deposited on the beach a man armed with long squirrel?rifle and an axe, and carrying food and clothing in a brown canvas pack. From the beach he watched the boat return and saw the schooner weigh anchor and stand out to sea before the northwest trades. When she had disappeared from...

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The Cop and the Anthem

By: O. Henry

Excerpt: On his bench in Madison Square Soapy moved uneasily. When wild goose honk high of nights, and when women without sealskin coats grow kind to their husbands, and when Soapy moves uneasily on his bench in the park, you may know that winter is near at hand. A dead leaf fell in Soapy?s lap. That was Jack Frost?s card. Jack is kind to the regular denizens of Madison Square, and gives fair warning of his annual call. At the corners of four streets he hands his pastebo...

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Donal Grant

By: George Macdonald

It was a lovely morning in the first of summer. Donal Grant was descending a path on a hillside to the valley below -- a sheep-track of which he knew every winding as well as any boy his half-mile to and from school. But he had never before gone down the hill with the feeling that he was not about to go up again. He was on his way to pastures very new, and in the distance only negatively inviting. But his heart was too full to be troubled -- nor was his a heart to harbou...

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Literary Taste

By: Arnold Bennett

At the beginning a misconception must be removed from the path. Many people, if not most, look on literary taste as an elegant accomplishment, by acquiring which they will complete themselves, and make themselves finally fit as members of a correct society. They are secretly ashamed of their ignorance of literature, in the same way as they would be ashamed of their ignorance of etiquette at a high entertainment, or of their inability to ride a horse if suddenly called up...

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Memoirs of Marie Antoinette, Volume 3

By: Madame Campan

Excerpt: CHAPTER VI. During the first few months of his reign Louis XVI. dwelt at La Muette, Marly, and Compiegne. When settled at Versailles he occupied himself with a general examination of his grandfather?s papers. He had promised the Queen to communicate to her all that he might discover relative to the history of the man with the iron mask, who, he thought, had become so inexhaustible a source of conjecture only in consequence of the interest which the pen of a cele...

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