World Library  

Other People Who Read Allan Quatermain Also Read


 
  • Cover Image

Dark Hollow

By: Anna Katherine Green

BOOK I. THE WOMAN IN PURPLE I. WHERE IS BELA? A high and narrow gate of carefully joined boards, standing ajar in a fence of the same construction! What is there in this to rouse a whole neighbourhood and collect before it a group of eager, anxious, hesitating people? I will tell you. This fence is no ordinary fence, and this gate no ordinary gate; nor is the fact of the latter standing a trifle open, one to be lightly regarded or taken an inconsiderate advantage of. For...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Man from the Moon

By: Otis Adelbert Kline

Excerpt: LOOKING forward is always an interesting occupation, for the imagination can be given absolute free play and so many seemingly fantastic pictures may be called into being.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Episode of the Seldon Goldmine

By: Grant Allen

Charles maintained that Marvillier ought to have known the man with the cropped hair was Colonel Clay, and ought never to have recommended him. Marvillier maintained that Charles had seen Colonel Clay half-a-dozen times, at least, to his own never; and that my respected brother-in-law had therefore nobody on earth but himself to blame if the roguc imposed upon him. The head detective had known Medhurst for ten years, he said, as a most respectable man, and even a ratepay...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Huttens Letzte Tage

By: Conrad Ferdinand Meyer

Excerpt: I. Die Landung Schiffer! Wie nennst du dort im Wellenblau Das Eiland? ?Herr, es ist die Ufenau!? Ein gruener Ort. Dank, Zwingli, fuer die Rast, Die du, der Gute, mir bereitet hast! In braunen Woelklein wirbelt auf ein Rauch, Bewohnt von Menschen scheint das Eiland auch. Willkommen, mein gewuenschtes Ithaka! Ein irrender Odysseus bin ich ja. Viel kaempften, edler Dulder, beide wir; In andern Stuecken gleich? ich wenig dir Und nicht im Eignen werd? ich wohnen dort...

Read More
  • Cover Image

When God Laughs and Other Stories

By: Jack London

Carquinez had relaxed finally. He stole a glance at the rattling windows, looked upward at the beamed roof, and listened for a moment to the savage roar of the south-easter as it caught the bungalow in its bellowing jaws. Then he held his glass between him and the fire and laughed for joy through the golden wine. It is beautiful, he said. It is sweetly sweet. It is a woman's wine, and it was made for gray-robed saints to drink. We grow it on our own warm hills, I said, w...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Hunting Weather

By: Mary Austin

Excerpt: WHEN misty, misty mornings come, When wild geese low are flying, And down along the reedy marsh The mallard drakes are crying; When cattle leave the highest hills, And blackbirds flock together By all these signs the hunter knows Has come good hunting weather.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Julius Caesar's War Commentaries

By: W. A. Mcdevitte and W. S. Bohn

[1.1]All Gaul is divided into three parts, one of which the Belgae inhabit, the Aquitani another, those who in their own language are called Celts, in our Gauls, the third. All these differ from each other in language, customs and laws. The river Garonne separates the Gauls from the Aquitani; the Marne and the Seine separate them from the Belgae. Of all these, the Belgae are the bravest, because they are furthest from the civilization and refinement of [our] Province, an...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Not That It Matters

By: A. A. Milne

Sometimes when the printer is waiting for an article which really should have been sent to him the day before, I sit at my desk and wonder if there is any possible subject in the whole world upon which I can possibly find anything to say. On one such occasion I left it to Fate, which decided, by means of a dictionary opened at random, that I should deliver myself of a few thoughts about goldfish. (You will find this article later on in the book.) But to-day I do not need...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Versebook of a Homely Woman

By: Fay Inchfawn (Elizabeth Rebecca Ward)

Excerpt: THE Long View Some day of days! Some dawning yet to be I shall be clothed with immortality! And, in that day, I shall not greatly care That Jane spilt candle grease upon the stair. It will not grieve me then, as once it did, That careless hands have chipped my teapot lid. I groan, being burdened. But, in that glad day, I shall forget vexations of the way. That needs were often great, when means were small, Will not perplex me any more at all A few short years at...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Two Altars; Or, Two Pictures in One

By: Harriet Beecher Stowe

The well-sweep of the old house on the hill was relieved dark and clear, against the reddening sky, as the early winter sun was going down in the west. It was a brisk, clear, metallic evening; the long drifts of snow blushed lilac in the hollows; and the old wintry wind brushed shrewdly along the plain, tingling people's noses, blowing open their cloaks, puffing in the back of their necks, and showing other unmistakable indications that he was getting up steam for a real roistering night.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Last Poems

By: William Butler Yeats

Excerpt: Under Ben Bulben. I SWEAR by what the sages spoke Round the Mareotic Lake That the Witch of Atlas knew, Spoke and set the cocks a?crow. Swear by those horsemen, by those women Complexion and form prove superhuman, That pale, long?visaged company That air in immortality Completeness of their passions won; Now they ride the wintry dawn Where Ben Bulben sets the scene.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Condensed Novels

By: Bret Harte

Contents: HANDSOME IS AS HANDSOME DOES LOTHOW, or THE ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN IN SEARCH OF A RELIGION MUCK-A-MUCK, A MODERN INDIAN NOVEL, AFTER JAMES FENIMORE COOPER TERENCE DENVILLE SELINA SEDILIA THE NINETY-NINE GUARDSMEN [AFTER THE THREE MUSKETEERS, BY DUMAS] MISS MIX [AFTER CHARLOTTE BRONTE] GUY HEAVYSTONE; OR, ENTIRE. MR. MIDSHIPMAN BREEZY JOHN JENKINS; OR, THE SMOKER REFORMED NO TITLE [AFTER WILKE COLLINS] Contains: MARY JONES’S NARRATIVE THE SLIM YOUNG MAN...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Tragedy of Anthonie, And Cleopatra

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Philo. Nay, but this dotage of our Generals Ore?flowes the measure: those his goodly eyes That o're the Files and Musters of the Warre, Haue glow?d like plated Mars: Now bend, now turne The Office and Deuotion of their view Vpon a Tawny Front. His Captaines heart, Which in the scuffles of great Fights hath burst The Buckles on his brest, reneages all temper, And is become the Bellowes and the Fan To coole a Gypsies Lust.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Excerpt: Part One. On Contemplations. Before beginning any spiritual text it is customary to clear the mind of all distracting thoughts, to calm the breath and to purify the heart. 1.1 Now, instruction in Union. 1.2. Union is restraining the thought?streams natural to the mind. 1.3. Then the seer dwells in his own nature. 1.4. Otherwise he is of the same form as the thought?streams. 1.5. The thought?streams are five?fold, painful and not painful. 1.6. Right knowledge, wr...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Down with the Cities!

By: Tadashi Nakashima

Chapter I Notes It is possible to modernize agriculture (a primary industry) as well, but this becomes possible only with the intervention of the secondary and tertiary industries. Agriculture is meant to be in accord with the cycle of Nature; it is supposed to be ceaseless repetition.

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Captain of the Polestar and Other Tales

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

PREFACE: For the use of some of the following Tales I am indebted to the courtesy of the Proprietors of Cornhill, Temple Bar, Belgravia, London Society, Cassell's, and The Boy's Own Paper. A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D. THE CAPTAIN OF THE POLE-STAR. [Being an extract from the singular journal of JOHN M`ALISTER RAY, student of medicine.] September 11th. Lat. 81 degrees 40' N.; long. 2 degrees E. Still lying-to amid enormous ice fields. The one which stretches away to the north of u...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Journals of Lewis and Clark

Excerpt: Setting Forth I dispatched an express this morning to Captain Lewis at St. Louis. All our provisions, goods, and equipage on board of a boat of 22 oars [party], a large pirogue of 71 oars [in which 8 French], a second pirogue of 6 oars [soldiers], complete with sails, Men completed with powder cartridges and 100 balls each, all in health and readiness to set out. (The words and phrases in brackets did not appear in the original journals. They represent additions...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Myths and Legends of Our Own Land, V6

By: Charles M. Skinner

Excerpt: In 1786 a little building stood at North Bend, Ohio, near the junction of the Miami and Ohio Rivers, from which building the stars and stripes were flying. It was one of a series of blockhouses built for the protecting of cleared land while the settlers were coming in, yet it was a trading station rather than a fort, for the attitude of government toward the red men was pacific. The French of the Mississippi Valley were not reconciled, however, to the extension ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World from Marathon to Waterloo

By: Sir Edward Creasy, M. A.

PREFACE: It is an honourable characteristic of the Spirit of this Age, that projects of violence and warfare are regarded among civilized states with gradually increasing aversion. The Universal Peace Society certainly does not, and probably never will, enrol the majority of statesmen among its members. But even those who look upon the Appeal of Battle as occasionally unavoidable in international controversies, concur in thinking it a deplorable necessity, only to be res...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Young Laird and Edinburgh Katy

By: Allan Ramsay

Excerpt: Now wat ye wha I met yestreen Coming down the street, my Jo, My mistress in her tartan screen, Fow bonny, braw and sweet, my Jo. My dear, quoth I, thanks to the night, That never wish?d a lover ill, Since ye?re out of your mither?s sight, Let?s take a wauk up to the hill. O Katy wiltu gang wi? me, And leave the dinsome town a while, The blossom?s sprouting frae the tree, And a? the summer?s gawn to smile; The mavis, nightingale and lark, The bleeting lambs and w...

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from National Public Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.